Quick Answer: Potassium is an electrolyte that helps offset the blood pressure-raising effects of sodium. It also helps muscles contract, maintains fluid balance, and keeps your heart beating normally.

Well, this is concerning. The USDA considers potassium a ‘nutrient of concern’ because most people don’t get enough. Why? Our diets are typically low in fruits, veggies, and dairy—three major sources. Adults should aim for 4.7 grams (4,700 milligrams) of potassium each day.

Potassi-yum: You can get your potassium fix by eating fruits and vegetables as well as fish, milk and yogurt.

Here are some particularly rich sources:

Plant-based:

  • Potato, baked, with skin: 941 mg*
  • Tomato paste, ¼ cup: 669 mg
  • Beet greens, ½ cup cooked: 654 mg
  • White beans, ½ cup canned: 595 mg
  • Pumpkin seeds, 1 cup roasted: 588 mg
  • Blackstrap molasses, 1 tablespoon: 498 mg
  • Orange juice, fresh, 1 cup: 496 mg
  • Winter squash, ½ cup cooked: 448 mg
  • Banana, 1 medium: 422 mg
  • Cooked spinach, ½ cup: 370 – 419 mg
  • Dried peaches, ¼ cup: 399 mg
  • Cantaloupe, ¼ medium: 368 mg
  • Lentils, ½ cup cooked: 365 mg
  • Plantains, ½ cup sliced, cooked: 358 mg
  • Kidney beans, ½ cup cooked: 357 mg
  • Chia seeds, 1 oz: 44 mg

 

Animal-based:

  • Plain, nonfat yogurt, 8-ounce container: 579 mg
  • Salmon, Atlantic, wild, cooked, 3 ounces: 534 mg
  • Halibut, 3 ounces cooked: 449 mg
  • Milk, skim, 1 cup: 382 mg
  • Yogurt, plain, whole milk, 8-ounce container: 352 mg